Commercial Spaceflight And The Dawning Age of NewSpace

Archive for February, 2016

Bridenstine Lays Out Multipronged Legislative Agenda for Commercial Space

Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-Oklahoma) is planning a multipronged approach to getting government space agencies to adopt commercial solutions. He will introduce a comprehensive bill — the American Space Renaissance Act — later this year, but does not expect it to pass en toto. Instead, he sees it as a repository of “plug and play” provisions that will be inserted into other pieces of legislation, especially this year’s National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

Speaking at a Commercial Spaceflight Federation (CSF) breakfast meeting on Friday, Bridenstine laid out his plans “to promote policies that will permanently make America the predominant spacefaring nation.” A draft of the American Space Renaissance Act will be released at the Space Foundation’s Space Symposium in April and Bridenstine is seeking feedback from interested parties.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.spacepolicyonline.com

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Telesat launch agreements awarded to SpaceX | Spaceflight Now

The Canadian telecom satellite operator Telesat plans to launch two multipurpose communications spacecraft aboard SpaceX Falcon rockets in 2018, the company disclosed this week in a quarterly earnings announcement.

The Ottawa-based company did not say if the new satellites, named Telstar 18 Vantage and Telstar 19 Vantage, would fly aboard Falcon 9 rockets or the more powerful — but still untested — Falcon Heavy launcher.

Telstar 18V and 19V are both due for launch in early 2018.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: spaceflightnow.com

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Bridenstine to introduce space policy bill in April | SpaceNews.com

WASHINGTON — Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-Okla.) said Feb. 26 he plans to introduce a wide-ranging space policy bill in April, but acknowledges that the full bill is unlikely to pass this year.

Speaking at a Commercial Spaceflight Federation breakfast here, Bridenstine said he will circulate a draft of his proposed American Space Renaissance Act with industry in the next few weeks. He will then formally introduce the bill during the 32nd Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colorado, in April.

“The overall point of the bill is to promote policies that will permanently make America the predominant spacefaring nation,” he said in his remarks. “A big part of that is fostering, encouraging and incentivizing industry to innovate and thrive here in the United States.”

Sourced through Scoop.it from: spacenews.com

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ESA boss Jan Wörner on building a Moon village

ESA Director General Jan Wörner would like to build a village on the Moon, manned by robots and astronauts. The head of the European Space Agency explains the how, why and when of this extraordinary plan in an interview with Euronews Space producer Jeremy Wilks.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: audioboom.com

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Bigelow Aerospace: Inflatable Modules for ISS

Bigelow Aerospace is a firm focused on building inflatable space station modules. In January 2013, NASA announced that it would pay nearly $18 million for Bigelow to build a new room for the International Space Station. That room, called the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), is expected to launch for a two-year mission in April 2016.

While Bigelow’s visions for space stations and a moon base are still on the drawing board, the company already has two inflatable prototypes in orbit. Genesis 1 launched in July 2006, and Genesis 2 in June 2007. The company still watches over the prototypes to determine how they perform long-term.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.space.com

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SpaceX launch aborted in final minutes | Spaceflight Now

SpaceX kept an upgraded Falcon 9 rocket on the ground Thursday after running into a problem loading super-cold liquid propellants into the launcher’s fuel tanks, postponing blastoff of a commercial communications satellite for the second day in a row.

The California-based rocket company did not say when the next launch attempt could occur.

The Falcon 9 rocket’s countdown proceeded normally Thursday until a member of the SpaceX launch team called a hold at approximately T-minus 1 minute, 41 seconds, before the scheduled launch time of 6:47 p.m. EST (2347 GMT).

Sourced through Scoop.it from: spaceflightnow.com

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SpaceX scrubs SES-9 launch again | SpaceNews.com

WASHINGTON — For the second night in a row, SpaceX postponed the launch of a Falcon 9 rocket carrying the SES-9 communications satellite Feb. 25, citing a last-minute problem with propellant loading.

SpaceX halted the countdown 1 minute and 41 seconds before the scheduled 6:47 p.m. Eastern liftoff of the rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida. SpaceX manager John Insprucker, on the company’s webcast of the launch, said that launch controllers were “still evaluating” loading during the final minutes of the countdown and decided to stop the launch.

Although the launch window extended for more than 90 minute, Insprucker said that the timing of the hold, so close to the scheduled launch, meant that SpaceX had to call off the launch for the day. A new launch date has not been set, but Insprucker said it would likely be in a “couple of days or so.”

Sourced through Scoop.it from: spacenews.com

See on Scoop.itThe NewSpace Daily