Commercial Spaceflight And The Dawning Age of NewSpace

Archive for August, 2015

Congress, Don’t Make Us Hitch Rides With Russia. Love, NASA

Saturday will mark 1,500 days since the Space Shuttle touched down for the final time. Grounding human spaceflights was always supposed to be temporary as we made the necessary transition to a new generation of spacecraft, operated by American commercial carriers. Likewise, paying for seats on Russian spacecraft to send our astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) was always intended to be a stopgap.

Had Congress adequately funded President Obama’s Commercial Crew proposal, we could have been making final preparations this year to once again launch American astronauts to space from American soil aboard American spacecraft.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.wired.com

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Asteroids loom as the new Klondike for Seattle space industry

Seattle could profit from the rush for resources in outer space much as it did during the Klondike Gold Rush of the 1890s: by selling goods and services to the fortune-seekers.

At least that’s the vision laid out by entrepreneurs who are laying the groundwork in Seattle — and in space — for what they hope will be a multitrillion-dollar asteroid mining industry.

“I do believe that the first trillion is going to be made in space,” Peter Diamandis, one of the founders of Redmond-based Planetary Resources, said via video during a Seattle Space Entrepreneurs reception at Kirkland’s Marina Park on Thursday.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.geekwire.com

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Guest column: Camden Spaceport may impact environment | jacksonville.com

Camden County is on the verge of a big conversation.

The county will partner with the Federal Aviation Authority to evaluate the potential costs and benefits of subsidizing the development of a multi-million dollar spaceport.

As officials contemplate spending millions of tax dollars on this new facility, we must take our head out of the clouds and impartially evaluate the project’s true costs and benefits.

There is a big black hole where specific details should be. about the Camden County Spaceport. We can look to other facilities to understand the potential impact on coastal Georgia.

Currently, there are 10 commercially operated launch sites in the United States. While they are all different, there are common guidelines and impacts.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: m.jacksonville.com

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More than $2 Billion Invested in Space Companies since 2012 | SpaceNews.com

WASHINGTON — Emerging companies in the space industry, ranging from launch vehicle developers to satellite services providers, have raised more than $2 billion from investors since 2012, although the vast majority of that funding came from just two deals earlier this year.

A report released Aug. 28 by CB Insights, a New York-based financial intelligence firm, concluded that investments in space companies since the beginning of 2012 totaled $2.16 billion, including $1.75 billion in the first half of 2015 alone.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: spacenews.com

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To Infinity And Beyond With Investments: Rocketing Into Space Investing

“Like most investors, Sunil Nagaraj of Bessemer Venture Partners is always looking for that next big thing to invest in and turn into a significant return. While the global venture capital firm has primarily invested in tech and health care, the fund has significantly ramped up its efforts around investing in space. He sat down with me to talk about boldly going where few people have gone before in investing and what he and his team look for when selecting a startup for funding.”

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.forbes.com

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U.S. Air Force to Award Integration Studies to SpaceX | SpaceNews.com

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Air Force disclosed plans to award SpaceX a contract worth about $1 million to study the ins and outs of mating national security satellites to the company’s Falcon 9 rocket.

According to a justification and approval document posted to the Federal Business Opportunities website Aug. 26, the $962,000 contract would cover 10 studies as the service prepares to enter a new era of competitively awarded launch missions.

For nearly a decade, the Defense Department has relied exclusively on United Launch Alliance’s Atlas 5 and Delta 4 rockets to launch its operational military and intelligence satellites. But in May, the Air Force certified the Falcon 9 rocket to launch national security missions.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: spacenews.com

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NASA Assures Congress Orb-3 and SpX-7 Investigations Are Similar

NASA told Congress this week that it is not giving SpaceX special treatment in the investigation of the Orb-3 and SpX-7 launch failures, but that the investigations are quite similar. It said the perception that NASA’s role in studying the SpaceX failure is less intense is the result of a misunderstanding.

House Science, Space, and Technology Committee chairman Lamar Smith (R-TX) wrote to NASA earlier this month asking a series of questions about NASA’s role in finding the causes of the two failures: the October 28, 2014 failure of Orbital Sciences Corporation’s Antares rocket with a Cygnus capsule loaded with supplies for the International Space Station (ISS) and the June 28, 2015 failure of SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket with a Dragon capsule also full of supplies for the ISS. Both launches were under the Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) contract between NASA and the two companies. The Antares/Cygnus launch was Orbital’s third CRS launch, Orb-3. SpaceX’s launch was its seventh under the CRS contract — SpaceX CRS-7 or SpX-7.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.spacepolicyonline.com

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