Commercial Spaceflight And The Dawning Age of NewSpace

Archive for June, 2013

Differences in FAA/AST funding presage NASA funding battle | Space Politics

See on Scoop.itThe NewSpace Daily

The Senate Appropriations Committee passed a pair of fiscal year 2014 appropriations bills on Thursday, including one that funds the FAA. The Senate bill includes $17.011 million for the FAA’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation. That’s significantly more than what the House’s version of the same appropriations bill provided for the office: $14.16 million, a level below 2012 and 2013 and low enough to raise concerns by some in the industry. (Funding for AST is within FAA’s Operations budget, which also gets more overall in the Senate version, although the difference isn’t as large in percentage terms: $9.71 billion versus $9.52 billion in the House.)

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Ad Astra completes preliminary design review of engine to be tested in space

See on Scoop.itThe NewSpace Daily

[Houston, TX For immediate release] – After more than a year of planning and preparation, a team of Ad Astra engineers and physicists, along with NASA engineers participating as part of a technical interchange, completed the company’s first formal preliminary design review (PDR) of the VF – 200 engine. The 200 kW “proto – flight” is the company’s first engine planned to be tested in space. The review was conducted on Wednesday, June 26 , 2013 at Ad Astra’s research facility near Houston, TX.

 

The PDR incorporates the collective engineering knowledge gained over several years from the VX – 200 experimental program as well as multiple conceptual design studies carried out by the Ad Astra team . All major VF – 200 subsystems were reviewed, with special focus being placed on the thermal steady – state rocket core design . The thermal steady state – the capability of the rocket to maintain a stable temperature for extended periods of time – is to be initially tested in early 2014 with long – duration plasma firings, using Ad Astra’s existing facilities and the VX – 200SS (steady state) device . The VX – 200SS is a modified version of th e VX – 200, and it is currently under construction at Ad Astra’s Texas facility.

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Opinion: Will Bureaucrats Ground Private Space Before It Launches?

See on Scoop.itThe NewSpace Daily

XCOR Aerospace COO Andrew Nelson on the threat potential suborbital space regulations pose to America’s burgeoning space industry.

 

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Opinion: The Countdown to Private Spacecraft | Wall Street Journal Video

See on Scoop.itThe NewSpace Daily

 

XCOR Aerospace COO Andrew Nelson on the stunning advances in Americas private space industry.

 

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Opinion: The Countdown to Private Spacecraft

See on Scoop.itThe NewSpace Daily

 

XCOR Aerospace COO Andrew Nelson on the stunning advances in Americas private space industry.

 

See on live.wsj.com


CCiCAP: Capsule Countdown

See on Scoop.itThe NewSpace Daily

In the July 1 edition of Aviation Week & Space Technology, Guy Norris reports on the mounting pressure the budget squeeze has added to commercial crew tests. With Boeing and Space X both competing for NASA’s Commercial Crew Integrated Capability (CCiCAP), the race is heating up. Digital and tablet subscribers can read Guy’s story from Friday.

Meanwhile, the Sierra Nevada’s Dream Chaser engineering test article (ETA), which was awarded $212.5 million as part of the CCiCAP program,  recently begun tow tests at NASA’s Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards AFB, California.  

Here are Guy’s photos and notes on the program.

 

 

See on www.aviationweek.com


FAA Commercial Space Office Fares Much Better in Senate, House Cut Would be “Crippling”

See on Scoop.itThe NewSpace Daily

The House and Senate Appropriations Committees completed action on the FY2014 funding bill that includes the FAA this week.  The two took opposite approaches to funding the FAA’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST).   Mike Gold of Bigelow Aerospace calls a substantial cut approved by the House committee “crippling.”  Conversely, the Senate committee recommended more than the request.

 

 

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